Category Archives: Interactivity

Describe a City in One Word

I am quoted in this story about a Georgia city’s experiment with social media.

Dunwoody, GA city council


“According to Steven Polunsky at the Scholars Strategy Network at Texas A&M University, social media breaks down barriers between government officials such as Wescott and the public they serve.

“Polunsky said innovations such as Facebook and Twitter allow the public to express opinions and share information readily with officials and vice versa. …

“What if there were an easy way for citizens to share opinions with decision makers at optimal moments, when their views might really count?” Polunsky said. “New forms of social media may offer just such opportunities.”

http://thechampionnewspaper.com/news/local/public-describes-dunwoody-in-one-word/

Texas Tribune article

“You need to think through all the way to the end,” Polunsky cautions, “so that people feel not just that they had their say, but that they were listened to.”

Ross Ramsey interviews me for a Texas Tribune article about public testimony over the Internet.

Analysis: More Voices, and Perhaps, More Headaches

by

https://www.texastribune.org/2015/09/24/analysis-more-voices-and-perhaps-more-headaches/

Presentation to Interns

Sources Cited – 2015 Texas Legislative Intern Seminar

Government and Social Media

Social Media Update

Social Media Risks

 Crowdsourcing

 Trends in Allowing the Public to Comment

 Other

ImprovGuidelines

Center for Digital Government Award

Text of awardThe app was created and donated by Dan Galewsky. Download the app from the Google Store or get the code from Sourceforge.

Best of Texas 2012 Winners Announced (Government Technology Magazine)

Best of Texas award

Photograph by Center for Digital Government

Best of Texas award presentation

Photograph by Center for Digital Government

cdg3

Photograph by Center for Digital Government

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

 

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

Screenshot by Dan Galewsky of app in development

 

Petitions

A petition, whether on paper or online, is a tool with particular uses.

You need to know what you want to accomplish before you decide if a petition is the right tool or not.

If you want to influence the passage or failure of a particular bill or piece of legislation, a petition is not the right tool. Rather, you should focus your efforts on visiting with your elected officials. Using a petition for this goal is waste of time and effort.

If you want to generate interest and identify like-minded people, a petition is a good tool. Be aware that if you sign a petition, in all likelihood your email and other information will be collected (the industry term is “harvested”) and you will be contacted later. If you have privacy concerns, find out the petition organizer’s privacy policy before signing anything.

Petition

Source: http://shefightslikeagirl.tumblr.com/post/53912585091/https-petitions-whitehouse-gov-petition-veto-ruli

Bonus tips: if you organize a petition, aim it at the people who can do something about the problem. For example, don’t petition the White House if your concern is at the state legislative level. Also, if you are not a constituent, the impact of your petition will probably be reduced.